COL SOLARE

COL SOLARE

RED MOUNTAIN, WASHINGTON

After 10 years of collaboration, Ted Baseler of Chateau Ste. Michelle and Italy's Piero Antinori made the decision to build a 25,000 case winery and vineyard on Red Mountain for their Cabernet Sauvignon blend - Col Solare.  The iconic structure has three key elements: a 300 foot long, 25 foot high stone wall that cuts along the slope; a distinctive bell tower rising above the rolling hills; and a barrel-vaulted guest services building with panoramic views of the mountains and valley below.  The result is a dramatic confluence of wine-making and architecture.

BLUE GROUSE ESTATE WINERY AND VINEYARD

BLUE GROUSE ESTATE WINERY AND VINEYARD

COWICHAN STATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA  

Elements of the master plan include roads, trails, vineyard expansion,   ponds, a winery, vineyard barn, guest cottages, and manor house.   The winery takes cues from a birds form which separates this structure from the covey of wineries in Cowichan Valley on Vancouver Island.  The curve of the grouse’s head and neck is the design inspiration for the roof. The colors of the construction materials are of the bird’s feathers and the 22 foot tall blue entry doors is the color of a tail feather flashing in the sunlight.  The design employs sustainable strategies including: reuse of an existing structure; water recycling; controlled solar gain for summer cooling and winter heating; solartube skylights cutting approximately 66 percent of electricity use; underground barrel and sparkling wine storage and ground source heat pumps. Furniture Selection - Studio8, Austin 

THE GROUSE HOUSE

THE GROUSE HOUSE

COWICHAN STATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA  

Surrounded on four sides by vineyard, the Grouse House at Blue Grouse Estate Winery and Vineyard is the summer home for the Brunner family, owners of the estate.  The original three level, 3 bedroom residence built in the 60’s had low ceilings and small rooms, deficient electrical and mechanical systems, and the basement was the former tasting room for the winery.  It was in serious need of rehabbing.  Saving just the foundation and some of the framing allowed a reworking of the spaces into three bedroom suites, larger living spaces and high ceilings on both levels.  Boxwood collaborated with Jodi Foster Design + Planning; Tom Humber Cabinetry, Master Builder; Ishai Horticultural Knowledge, master gardener; and owners Paul and Cristina Brunner to create a winery retreat for the Brunner family. 

WATERS WINERY

WATERS WINERY

WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON

Waters Winery is clad in masonry and rusted corrugated steel panels, with a steeply pitched roof, exposed wood and steel trusses and 16 foot walls.  Views of grassy fields and the Blue Mountains in the distance complement the barn-like design.  With sustainability in mind, a large skylight in the barrel and fermentation areas creates day-lit working spaces, reducing the use of electricity.  Barrel rooms requiring constant temperature levels are contained in masonry walls and placed on the north side of the building, where temperature changes will be kept to a minimum.  This design saves energy with day-lighting, reduces the need for heating and cooling, and minimizes evaporation of wine from the barrels.

SOUTHWEST WINE CENTER

SOUTHWEST WINE CENTER

CLARKDALE, ARIZONA

Arizona's wine industry is growing quickly, creating a need for well-trained winery workers and vineyard managers in the desert southwest. The new Southwest Wine Center at Yavapai College in Arizona's Verde Valley allows for the winery, vineyard, student classrooms and labs to be located on a single campus. The teaching winery will be re-purposed from an underutilized outdoor racquetball building.

The winery will contain four main spaces, one in each former court: a fermentation room, two barrel-aging rooms and a tasting room where students will gain real-world experience in marketing and selling Yavapai College produced wine. End walls of each court will be filled in with large operable doors to promote views to the outside and create easy passage for visitors, winery workers and equipment. The winery location on campus also provides sweeping views from Mingus Mountain to Sycamore Canyon and the vineyard directly to the south.

During the initial years of operation the winery will produce up to 1,500 cases of wine per year. Eventually, the winery plans to produce 3,000 cases annually. Proceeds from the sale of student-produced wine will be dedicated to new scholarships and viticulture program support.

HIGHTOWER CELLARS

HIGHTOWER CELLARS

RED MOUNTAIN, WASHINGTON

In Boxwood's design for the Hightower Cellars renovation and expansion a solar screen made from fiber-reinforced cement-boards is applied to the existing structure’s exterior walls to shade the metal siding and naturally ventilate the heat away.  Rigid insulation and a new roof with a broader overhang hang further increase the building's thermal envelope.  The new tasting room and barrel storage built of Durisol block to help keep interior temperatures stable while skylights bring natural light into the work areas.  A unique fence made of reclaimed oak barrel staves woven together lines the property to create privacy without taking away from the beauty of the vineyard.

AUGUST CELLARS

AUGUST CELLARS

NEWBERG, OREGON

This wine facility makes use of a steeply sloping site with a dramatic, multi-level structure of four levels representing the winemaking process: a raised crush balcony, a lower fermentation level, a blending level and a barrel and bottling level.  Barrels are stored in subterranean vaults, while the tasting room is day-lit.  Translucent panels covering the work areas reduce the need for artificial lighting. Seventy percent of the rainwater is drained off the lower roof through a scupper into a detention pond, and used on the site.  Other sustainable features include concrete with high levels of fly-ash, certified cedar, and corrugated metal siding

CARLTON WINEMAKERS' STUDIO

CARLTON WINEMAKERS' STUDIO

CARLTON, OREGON

Winemaker Eric Hamacher and vineyard owners Kirsten and Ned Lumpkin wanted to create a shared winemaking and tasting facility for several winemakers near Carlton, Oregon.  Boxwood created a sustainable design with an innovative layout which allows full gravity processing for Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and sparking wine on the two processing levels.  The structure is bordered by a wall of earth, used to reduce energy consumption in the building and utilize the earth's natural cooling properties.  To further limit energy waste, a portion of the barrel storage is underground. 

NORTHWEST WINE ACADEMY

NORTHWEST WINE ACADEMY

SOUTH SEATTLE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Boxwood’s design concept to convert an existing machine shop into the Northwest Wine Academy maximizes teaching spaces by making most of the rooms multi-purpose.  In addition to two full time classrooms, the teaching lab classroom doubles as the working lab for the winery, the fermentation room with enough space to work the tanks, provides forklift access to much needed mezzanine storage area and also serves as a classroom with the addition of roll away bleachers and a white board. The kitchen where food is prepared for wine dinners and tastings is also a demonstration kitchen where up to 30 students learn the art of pairing wine with food – the single largest trend in new wineries today.  The tasting room and retail store with the addition of an outdoor patio can become an entertainment venue for college fundraisers for up to 300 people and be converted easily to a classroom or study hall for up to 45 students.

REYNVAAN FAMILY VINEYARDS

REYNVAAN FAMILY VINEYARDS

WALLA WALLA, WASHINGTON

The family made a decision to build the new vineyard maintenance building and asked Boxwood if we could adapt the building to be used as a temporary winery for a few years.   The building, planned with two workshops, one for tractor storage and maintenance and the other to store picking equipment, could work perfectly as a temporary winery.  It was designed with high ceilings, two large rooms and three large pairs of sliding barn doors.  By adding insulation, a glycol chiller sized to be relocated to the future winery, insulated overhead glass garage doors inside the barn doors, and some Solatubes, we could create a well-insulated and naturally daylit winery.  The building was well sited in the location of a former shed that had long since collapsed.  It is partially protected from the harsh south sun by a stand of Locust trees and two of the large doors open to the north in the shadow of the ever-present southwest wind.  The sloping site allows the structure to be pushed into the hillside, resulting in earth cooled walls for nearly half the building.  The completed building measures 36’ x 96’, is aligned with its long dimension in the east/west direction, and is divided roughly in half with a full height wall and a large overhead door.  A small storage room, mixing station, toilet, mechanical, and electrical spaces are in each of the four corners of the building.  The architecture is traditional agrarian style with white board and batten siding and a galvanized metal roof.  With the barn doors closed it looks as if it could have been in this location for generations.

BLUE GROUSE DISTILLERY

BLUE GROUSE DISTILLERY

COWICHAN STATION, BRITISH COLUMBIA  

After recently completing a new state of the art winery, Blue Grouse is expanding again. Nestled in the vineyard adjacent to the recently completed winery, a new distillery was designed through adaptive reuse of two existing barns. This approach preserves the character of the valley and saves building material. The smaller of the two buildings is tucked into the other, creating a new production, storage, and tasting facility. The distillery will produce grappa and vodkas from winery byproducts. The tasting space opens into a courtyard for guests to enjoy the spirits and valley view. 

ECHO RIDGE CELLARS

ECHO RIDGE CELLARS

Echo, OR

The Bales family overall commitment to sustainability, led them adapt an old concrete onion storage warehouse into their winery. Boxwood created individual insulated barrel room “cubes”  inside the existing structure as well as an internal crush pad, fermentation areas, office, lab, toilets, mechanical and electrical rooms.  

A bonus is the adjacent lap-wood grain elevator we are currently repurposing into their tasting room.  Both will be complete in 2016 for your visit.

NICHOLAS COLE CELLARS

NICHOLAS COLE CELLARS

NEW MULTI-TENANT WINERY | STUDY

NEW MULTI-TENANT WINERY | STUDY

CARLTON, OR

Boxwood’s successful sustainable winery design paradigms are expressed in new ways with this new winery designed to be a home for several winery tenants.  The metal building frame was wrapped in Faswall blocks (a construction material made from recycled wood shipping palets in a concrete matrix) instead of metal siding.  Daylighting was balanced with tall light monitors above each space that not only provide natural light, they double as chimney’s for heat evacuation and night time cooling and serve as intakes for CO2 evacuation.  Multiple large bay loading areas are perfect for grape delivery inside each space where crush takes place.  Barrel rooms are surrounded by Faswall blocks as well to isolate them from other spaces and reduce cooling loads.  Tenants can display their wines in a common tasting room located on the south west corner of the building reducing overhead for each winery.

DRAGON'S HEAD CIDERY

DRAGON'S HEAD CIDERY

AVENNIA TASTING ROOM

AVENNIA TASTING ROOM