JOINT TRAINING FACILITY

JOINT TRAINING FACILITY

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Letter of Commendation and a Citation of Outstanding Design from the Seattle Design Commission

The new 43,677 gross square foot, City of Seattle Joint Training Facility (JTF) supports the necessary training activities for the Seattle Fire Department and Seattle Public Utilities. The site selected by the City of Seattle for the project was an abandoned sand and gravel pit with a very high ground water table. A primary component of the project was to heal and restore as much of the site as possible to its natural ecosystem. Nearly 50% of the site is required to be impervious to support heavy apparatus.  Rainwater was designed to be collected (site capacity of 12.9 million gallons), filtered, treated and stored to supplement the training water reducing the demand on the city water system.

This facility has been certified as LEED Silver by the U.S. Green Building Council.

TCA Architecture provided consulting services to Boxwood for this project.

MT. BAKER STATION

MT. BAKER STATION

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Mt. Baker Station is an aerial light rail station for Sound Transit in the Rainier Valley. The facility has been coined as the new Gateway to the Valley,” providing a symbolic entryway to the neighborhood. As such, the station is now a catalyst for new commercial, retail, and residential development, creating new gathering places for the entire community as the neighborhood’s town center. Boxwood’s design concept for the side platform station provides a prominent entry on the north end with access from Rainier Avenue South, Martin Luther King Jr. Way, and McClellan Street. The design recognizes Mt. Baker Street Station as civic architecture that is a prominent fixture in the Rainier Valley cultural and physical landscape. Because the station is a major part of the community’s identity, it includes public art, park-like gathering places, and pedestrian amenities, such as benches, lighting, and landscaping. Materials that were used on one of Sound Transit’s largest stations are concrete, steel, brick veneer and glass.

LEWIS CREEK PARK AND VISITOR CENTER

LEWIS CREEK PARK AND VISITOR CENTER

BELLEVUE, WASHINGTON

This 50 acre wetlands park hosts wildlife, miles of trails and boardwalks, playfields and a visitor’s center.  Landscaping is native and the visitor center building speaks of water and the pooling of ideas.   It is a simple 5000 square foot structure employing straight forward materials and highlighting sweeping views.  It is in the detailing that the materials manifest the building into something special.  Sustainable features include a green roof, sustainable and economical materials, as well as naturally ventilated and daylit meeting spaces which are flexible and offer different configuration possibilities.

HOOD RIVER WATERFRONT PARK

HOOD RIVER WATERFRONT PARK

HOOD RIVER, OREGON

This community space, located on the banks of the Columbia River, is designed to provide a place for Hood River residents and visitors to the Gorge to enjoy the river.  Located on the great lawn, protected by windward and leeward landscape wind breaks, are two picnic shelters.  Designed to be nearly horizontally transparent, these stone and wood shelters consist of a horizontal roof plane supported on one side by a stone wall and on the other by wood columns and a lateral brace.  The stone wall steps down to counter top height to provide food preparation and serving surfaces and then steps down again to provide seating.  Creating solid walls around the picnic shelter to keep out the wind would create a dark, uninviting space.  Utilizing the landscape wind breaks allowed Boxwood to keep the shelter open and bright.  The restroom facility is designed using durable low maintenance materials, a simple shed roof for optimum solar panel orientations, natural ventilation and daylighting.  To maintain a predetermined budget, the size is too small for a vestibule so screens were added outside to provide visual privacy. 

YMCA

YMCA

MASON CITY, IOWA

AIA Iowa Chapter 2001 Merit Award of Excellence Iowa Commerce + AIA Iowa 2002 Honor Award of Excellence

Meeting the needs of a diverse client group, Boxwood’s innovative design for this $9 million, 58,000 square foot community recreation center found its inspiration in the careful integration of the function and material.  All design decisions were based on the central concept that materials and structural elements should reinforce and enhance the separations, transfers, and connections between building components.  These components include a childcare center, two gymnasiums, racquetball courts, a running track, spaces for social services, a free outreach clinic, an aerobics and wellness center, locker rooms, and a natatorium containing a competition length swimming pool.  Central spaces are designed to be secure and enclosed, while peripheral areas are more transparent and feature connections to natural light, exterior landscaping, and views of the surrounding community.  

PDZA ANIMAL HEALTH CARE FACILITY

PDZA ANIMAL HEALTH CARE FACILITY

TACOMA, WASHINGTON

Sustainable goals were identified by the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium and Boxwood prior to beginning the design process of this sustainable and highly technical building.  The building form integrates the structure into the park in which it is located with a sweeping green roof sloping into the hillside.  The use of natural light and ventilation creates comfortable and healthy environments for animals and staff.  The building is considered an “off-exhibit exhibit” by the zoo, and tours will be given of the facility with the sustainable elements as an educational component.  Researching costs thoroughly, balancing decisions, and securing donations helped to ensure that sustainable elements would be realistically incorporated.  This project was featured in the 2002 What Makes it Green? and Ten Shades of Green conferences.

GUIDE DOGS FOR THE BLIND CAMPUS

GUIDE DOGS FOR THE BLIND CAMPUS

BORING, OREGON

Boxwood provided master planning, architectural and interior design services for this 26.8-acre, 11-building campus for Guide Dogs for the Blind, Inc.  Nestled in a forest on a gently sloping site, the campus was created to be self-contained and energy efficient.  It includes dog kennels and training areas, veterinary facilities, a dormitory with complete food service, a visitor's center and pavilion, an amphitheater, offices, and staff residences.  During training, students live on campus to maximize time with the guide dogs.  Special care was taken to provide timeless furniture and finishes that are familiar to the blind population.  Design features include sweeping hipped roofs, warm-toned brick facades, and clerestories which provide day-lighting, reducing the consumption of electricity.

POOR CLARE PORTIUNCULA

POOR CLARE PORTIUNCULA

OMAHA, NEBRASKA

The Poor Clare Sisters in Omaha, Nebraska lead a contemplative lifestyle and their new Monastery was designed to reflect the values of their Fransiscan order.  The Poor Clare Sisters take a vow of poverty and lead a basic lifestyle, so there is no need for ornate decoration, and simple, long term materials are used to reflect this. Sustainable initiatives incorporated into the project include day lit spaces, natural ventilation, a green roof, geothermal heat, site water retention, reclaimed and recycled content materials, day lighting control, and energy efficient lighting.

The south wall of the sanctuary represents the founding base of the church and consists of stone and small punched openings.  The north wall represents the present and future of the church and consists of large expanses of glazing, wood, and slender columns.  Overhead a continuous skylight expands towards the front, providing natural light and highlighting the Portiuncula.

CURRIES COMPANY CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS

CURRIES COMPANY CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS

MASON CITY, IOWA

This two-story, 20,000 square foot corporate office building serves as a reflection of Mason City’s architectural past.  The structure adds to the heritage of similar structures within the city, representing a unique marriage of modern building techniques and Prairie style influences.  Pre-stressed concrete tilt-up panels provided speed in construction, yet blend harmoniously with the design idiom.  Cement plaster masses anchor the corners and flank the entry.  Interior spaces continue the design in floor plan arrangements, with open central areas and circulation removed to the outer corners of each floor.  Geometric patterns are repeated throughout the building in the reception desk, window grills, light fixtures, and balcony railings.  The building was selected as “one of Iowa’s architectural gems” by other architects in the state.

SUMMIT ASSISTANCE DOGS

SUMMIT ASSISTANCE DOGS

MUSIC MAN SQUARE

MUSIC MAN SQUARE

MASON CITY, IOWA

This large scale civic project serves as a tribute to Mason City native Meredith Willson, composer, writer and lyricist of “The Music Man”, and has become a national destination for music education and performance. Boxwood worked in partnership with B+C in Mason City to create the Meredith Willson Museum, a Children’s Music Exploratorium, a conservatory of music, two theaters, community rooms and an outdoor entertainment plaza. The building which stretches the length of a full city block has and interior streetscape replicating building facades adapted from the 1966 Warner Bros. film combined with historic Mason City buildings.  Included in the project was the remodel of Meredith Willson’s boyhood home.  

INSTITUTE FOR FOOD, WINE, WELLNESS | STUDY

INSTITUTE FOR FOOD, WINE, WELLNESS | STUDY

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

Seattle Central College asked Boxwood to develop a concept for this proposed center located just off campus.  It is a multi-story facility dedicated to educating students on how to create healthy nutritious food that is also delicious.  Included in the program are the following spaces:  restaurants, retail incubator spaces on street level, offices, 150 seat auditorium with a demonstration kitchen, teaching kitchens, food lab, computer lab, microbiology lab, and a roof top organic garden and greenhouse.  The building incorporates an existing two story brick building into its footprint.  Materials are steel, concrete, perforated weathering steel, and curtainwall glass.  Classrooms spaces are visually open to the street to create interest in the program and to be able to “see” students participating in a new type of culinary education. 

CORNET BAY STATE PARK

CORNET BAY STATE PARK

DECEPTION PASS, WA

Boxwood was selected as the architect to design picnic shelters, a comfort station and kiosk for Washington State Parks.  Required design criteria stated that it must be in the 1930 Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) vernacular that utilized logs for beams and purlins, battered granite walls, and wood windows and doors.  The comfort station contains men’s and women’s bathrooms and shower facilities.

KRUCKEBERG PAVILLION

KRUCKEBERG PAVILLION